The Can Fu Master

Posts tagged “so you think you can dance

The trailer for the first episode of Nordic Folksong – Tommy Franzen – is out!

The trailer for the first episode of Nordic Folksong is finally out! The official release is due in September. Big thanks to the creators Andreas Lindström and Emelie Krugly Hill. Have a look at the official website http://www.nordicfolksong.com/tommy

 

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Nordic Folksong is a documentary series that explores the lives of Scandinavian creative individuals living in England.

England has the greatest density of Scandinavian emigrants in the world and many of them are creative artists or designers that are not known by the Scandinavian audience. This documentary is trying to lift those that not only dears to move to another country but who believes in themselves and their dream of succeed as a creative artist.

Tommy arrived in the UK in 2001 and  is probably mostly recognised as the runner-up of BBC 1’s “So You Think You Can Dance” 2010 but some might have seen him in Mamma Mia – The Movie.  After working professionally as a performing artist for 16 years, Tommy has in the recent years also dwelled into choreography. Most recently he choreographed for ZooNation’s “Some Like It Hip Hop”

He was nominated for an award by the Critic’s Circle’s “National Dance Awards” in the “Best Male Performance (Modern)” category for his efforts in the show “Goldberg” at The Royal Opera House and “Blaze” (in which he also choreographed) at Sadler’s Wells Peacock Theatre

Tommy is working with the Russell Maliphant Company and is touring internationally with the show “The Rodin Project”. Tommy has also been nominated an Olivier Award 2012 for Outstanding Achievement in Dance.


£20 for top price tickets for Flash Mob – Time Out

These tickets needs to be ordered by midnight tonight 27th May 2014. Flash Mob is playing at the Peacock Theatre in London from 27th May-8th June 2014.

http://uk-offers.timeout.com/deals/entertainment-flash-mob

 

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MoveTube: the terrific Tommy Franzén – a National Dance awards shoo-in? By Judith Mackrell

With his quicksilver fluency and remarkable range – from B-boy dance to balletic grace – the former So You Think You Can Dance runner-up deserves to win this time.

Judith Mackrell

Tommy Franzén

Monumental … National Dance awards nominee Tommy Franzén performs in the Rodin Project at Sadler’s Wells. Photograph: Tristram Kenton for the Guardian

Last week, the nominations were announced for this year’s National Dance awards, and it’s no surprise that Tommy Franzén is in the running for outstanding male dancer. Whether touring in Zoo Nation’s Some Like it Hip Hop and Russell Maliphant’s The Rodin Project, or starring in Flashmob during its long Edinburgh run, there can hardly have been a night when Franzén wasn’t on stage during the past 12 months. But its not his stamina that makes him outstanding, it’s the quality and range of his dancing.

This glitzy showreel, culled from his appearance in the BBC’s So You Think You Can Dance, offers a quick tour around his signature skills. On a purely athletic level, there may be other B-boy dancers who execute fiercer turns or hold more heartstopping balances than Franzén – but I’ve seen none to match his quicksilver fluency. He glides and twists through a dance phrase like an eel (0.25-30), yet at the same time moves with a buoyancy that brings air and light to his footwork (0.50–59). It’s the hip-hop equivalent of classical ballon, and Franzén – who has worked with ballet dancers like Tamara Rojo in the past – seems to be consciously working classical elements into his repertory. At 1.27 he slips a brief pirouette in among the B-boy spins, while the climactic tumbling spin that concludes his final routine is like a reckless hip-hop version of the classical revoltade, in which the dancer appears to be vaulting over his own leg.

These clips were assembled to show Franzén’s best, point-scoring moves in SYTYCD. But while the shenanigans of the personality contest element robbed him of first place, what made him the honorary winner of that series was the exceptional musicality of his performances. In the first three routines, every move maximises the surface speed and bounce of the rhythm, yet Franzén still has the time to fill out the larger phrases, carving out his own expressive structure. It’s the secret of great popular dancing (Astaire had it too) and it’s very evident in the Beggin’ clip, where Franzén captures the song’s core dynamic of emotional yearning (the suspended spiral at 0.23) even while hurtling forward on its beat. In the final slow routine, set to Justin Timberlake’s Cry Me a River, it’s fascinating to watch him experimenting with the natural choppy pulse of hip-hop – slowing it down, stretching it out across the action of his arms and torso.

Franzén’s willingness to push himself against the grain of his genre is even more impressive in this clip from Classical Break, choreographed by Tony Adigun to a fragment of Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata.

The music develops through challengingly slow increments of harmony and melody – if Adigun’s choreographic response occasionally seems a tad gauche (0.58), Franzén’s body gets deep inside it. Here too he rounds out every phrase (O.24), but there’s a floating suspension to some of his movements (0.28-30) and a miraculous, gliding evenness of footwork (1.19) that create an uncanny dialogue with the long, romantic lines of the score.

Franzén can also do stillness, and in the concluding moments of this solo you can see him daring to use the full force of his physical presence. It’s a quality that made him a natural dancer for Maliphant, even though the latter’s choreography owes far more to the meditative dynamic of t’ai chi than the urban gregariousness of hip-hop.

In this section of the wall duet from the Rodin Project, Franzén and his fellow B-boy dancer Dickson Mbi perform the extraordinary feat of dancing on a vertical plane. It takes strength and balance (Franzén is also a dedicated rock climber), but their graceful, molten manoeuvres combine a fusion of the human and the monumental that’s powerfully affecting – and a true homage to Rodin’s art.

Click here to view original article on The Guardian website.

If I guaranteed to save you money, would you click this? ==> www.SavvySavings.Org.uk


Tommy Franzén & The Elektrolytes Dance Crew at Crane TV

Here is a video of me and the Elektrolytes on Crane TV, leading up to Flash Mob’s opening at Peacock Theatre 16th October – 4th November.

Book your tickets here!

If I guaranteed to save you money, would you click this? ==> www.SavvySavings.Org.uk


Flash Mob opening night tonight!!

Flash Mob is opening today at The Peacock Theatre and will be running until 4th November 2012. I  was performing in Flash Mob when we originally created it for the Edinburgh Festival 2012. For the London version I was only a tiny bit involved in the choreography but it was great to somehow be a little bit involved again nevertheless. Hope you are coming to watch this dance extravaganza!

Book your tickets here ==> http://www.sadlerswells.com/show/Flash-Mob

Performers: Charlie Bruce (Winner of SYTYCD UK), Alleviate (Got to Dance), Brosena (Got to dance),  R.Elle Niane (Streetdance 3D 2) and her dance partner Edwar Ramos and Elektrolytes (Winners of America’s Best Dance Crew).
Artistic Director: Gary Lloyd. Assistant: Rachel Kay

Producer: World Dance Management

If I guaranteed to save you money, would you click this? ==> www.SavvySavings.Org.uk


Review Compilation of “Flash Mob” at Edinburgh Festival 2012

Pre-Review…Dance shows have never really featured as much at the fringe over its million years unlike it does now. With a variety of hugely popular dance shows on TV the public demand for more dance shows has meant they now have the chance to not only get created but to tour and feature at the worlds biggest fringe festival.

This year “Flash Mob” is on a path to becoming the most talked about dance show of the fringe 2012. Filled with performers from all spheres of the dancing work “Flash Mob” has been causing stirs and now there is an opportunity to see why.

Though this was only day 2 of their shows at Assembly Festival main hall the early technical problems could have been more problematic than they where. It did get a little uncomfortable to see the dancers have to restart but it didn’t seem to faze the audience and they quickly managed to get it fixed though throughout the show there would still be a few glitches which I only mention do to the emotional beauty that these dancers showcased last night.

The ability, skill, and wonderment that each of the different dancers brought to the show was remarkable but I only had two issues. The first was a lack of story – the dancers are at the very top of their game and produce such a mesmerising spectacle on stage their different ability and skills could have been woven into a different narrative. The second issue was that the female dancers where not given their own section like the male dancers had been. As performers each of the women dancer showcased, grace, strength, and beauty in such a remarkable way and should have been able to move away from the male dancers and given their moment to shine.

A Contemporary  Move

When the Olivier Award nominate Tommy Franzen came on stage to perform a tough and physically brutal and honest contemporary piece the show change. In a stunning display of skill and ability Franzen showed just why he is an Olivier Award nominated performer. It was a heartbreaking piece to watch as Franzen moved in perfect balance with the music, his body wrapping around every note heard creating something truly breathtaking.

The whole piece was inspiring.

Link to the original article http://www.thenewcurrent.com/2012/08/04/edinburgh-fringe-festival-2012-review-flash-mob/

 

The Scotsman -  5 stars

Dance review: Flash Mob, Assembly Hall (Venue 35), Edinburgh

Flash Mob includes jaw-dropping moves from a talented ensemble of performers.

By KELLY APTER
Published on Monday 6 August 2012 16:39

FOR every self-indulgent, esoteric, audience-alienating dance show ever performed, Flash Mob is the antidote.

Flash Mob

Assembly Hall (venue 35)

Rating: *****

Don’t be confused by the title – this is no shopping-centre gathering where those around you suddenly burst into synchronised movement. This is a dance mob that’s flash – although for “flash”, read talented, hard-working and completely dedicated to their craft.

For those who think commercial dance means leaving your artistry at the door, then the five acts brought together to create this Fringe highlight are ready to prove you wrong.

Most of them have come to the public eye via television, reaching the finals of one of the recent glut of dance programmes re-igniting the genre.

Tommy Franzén is probably the best known, having been runner-up in the 2010 series of So You Think You Can Dance? and, fittingly, the production opens with him in a spot-lit solo.

But this is no one-man show. Flash Mob is a celebration of dance and the many wonderful forms it comes in. Known mainly as a hip hop performer, Franzén also does a nice line in contemporary dance, with some reflective work peppered with breakdance moves. When it comes to contemporary, however, Alleviate are the stars of the show.

Nicolette Whitley and Renako McDonald were runners-up in 2011’s Got To Dance, and their two heart-felt duets, one of which uses the Eminem/Rihanna song Love The Way You Lie to great effect, are joy to watch.

Having only recently made the final in this year’s Got To Dance, A Team has yet to make a name for itself in the way Diversity and Flawless have, but this slick hip hop crew deserves to. Four men and one woman switch from one soundtrack to the next in the blink of an eye, throwing in some impressive back-flips to warm up the crowd.

A superb and utterly spellbinding Irish dance duo, Brosena (also from this year’s Got To Dance), and sensual Latin couple Mike Viry and Yunaisy Farray, complete the bill, widening out the dance genre further, with Viry in particular providing some jaw-dropping moves.

It’s this pick-and-mix quality that makes Flash Mob such a great ambassador for dance as a whole. The only problem with the show is it lasts just an hour. With such joyous talent and variety on offer, that could easily have been doubled without fear of boredom.

Link to the original article http://www.scotsman.com/the-scotsman/scotland/dance-review-flash-mob-assembly-hall-venue-35-edinburgh-1-2453185#.UB_vjhP9FSw.twitter

 

The Independant – 4 Stars

Flash Mob, Assembly Hall, Edinburgh

star number 1star number 2star number 3star number 4star number 5

Thursday 16 August 2012

When the dancers of Flash Mob ask the audience to join in with a dancealong routine, they get a giggly, enthusiastic response. It’s a happy ending for a friendly show that brings together dancers from various reality TV dance series, in styles from hip hop to Irish dance.

The dancers create their own numbers, which makes for variable choreography but warm, committed performance. Some routines have the cheesy openness of a 1980s dance movie: there’s big emoting and swoopy moves from contemporary duo Alleviate. Irish dance duo Brosena have a very Eurovision soundtrack, but match it with sparkling footwork. Mike Viry and Yunaisy Farray, who appeared in the movie Streetdance 2 3D, ripple and undulate through Latin numbers, hips and shoulders boggling.

The stellar performance comes from Tommy Franzén, recently nominated for an Olivier award. He shows both his street and contemporary dance sides, from weighted, curling moves to a sugar rush of a routine to the Jackson 5. He leads a cheerful rehearsal number with the other men, trying out styles and pretending to pinch each other’s showiest moves.

Link to the original article http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/theatre-dance/reviews/flash-mob-assembly-hall-edinburgh-8052984.html

 

The Independent

Flash Mob – Edinburgh festival review

Flash Mob

Bouncy and aspirational … Flash Mob’s performers have been culled from TV reality shows. Photograph: Murdo Macleod for the Guardian

Britain has apparently become a nation of dancers, or at least a nation addicted to TV dance shows. The finale of this short, entertaining production sees the entire audience getting to their feet in response to instructions from the stage, uniting in a mass hand-jiving, hips-sashaying dance.

The selling point of Flash Mob is that its performers have been culled from TV shows, with headliner Tommy Franzen, a finalist from BBC1′s So You Think You Can Dance. What makes Franzen a star, however, has little to do with his screen celebrity: it’s the skill and musicality of his dancing.

His style is a mix of choppy footwork, one-arm balances and slippery dives, all delivered with a manner that’s part hip-hop homeboy, part music hall comic. On top of this, Franzen can layer elements of contemporary dance, jive and ballet, and phrase it all with such rhythmic acuteness that every move has a three-dimensional expressiveness.

Franzen alone is worth the price of a ticket – but unfortunately everyone else on stage ranks in very sharply descending order of appeal. My favourites are Irish dance duo Brosena, particularly their belter of an opener, which features a hip-hop version of Beethoven’s Fifth driving their feet to an intensity of swivelling, criss-crossing speeds.

A-Team deliver some tight and tough street routines, fronted by tiny schoolgirl Suki, whose speciality is balancing on one leg and jabbing the other high in the air, an angelic kung fu master in trainers.

Mike Viry and Yunaisy Farray look out of place, however, their strenuous sultriness imported from late-night Cuban cabaret; while contemporary dance couple Alleviate need to find better choreography than their literal-minded duets of sex and heartbreak.

Still, the bouncy, aspirational style of the show is hard to resist. The evening I saw it, one small child refused to leave her spot as the theatre emptied, still rapturously going through the closing flashmob dance.

Link to the original article http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2012/aug/17/flash-mob-review?newsfeed=true


“Flash Mob” now of sale for our Edinburgh Festival 2012 run

Full line up for Edinburgh is Olivier award nominee and So You Think You Can Dance runner up Tommy Franzén, Got To Dance runners up Alleviate, The A-Team also from Got To Dance, Mark Swarf Calape winner of Move Like Michael Jackson, Brosena from Got To Dance and Mike Viry and Yunaisy Farray, Latin dancers from StreetDance 2 3D the movie. Where dance worlds collide, this will be an explosive show directed by the award winning Gary Lloyd (Thriller Live, Hair etc). Get tickets now http://www.assemblyfestival.com/event.php?id=182

 


I’ve been nominated an Olivier Award 2012 for Outstanding Achievement in Dance

I’ve been nominated a Laurence Olivier Award 2012 for Outstanding Achievement in Dance for my efforts in Some Like It Hip Hop. It’s an immense honour for me and also for the fact that I’m in the same category as Sylvie Guillem. That means it will be very hard to win it but just being nominated is amazing enough for me.

Some Like It Hip Hop is also nominated for Best New Dance Show whereof  I’m one of the choreographers alongside Kate Prince and Carrie-Anne Ingrouille. Additional choreography by Duwane Taylor and Ryan Chappell.

Fingers crossed we’ll win something!!

http://londondance.com/articles/news/olivier-awards-2012/

http://www.olivierawards.com/nominations/view/item137195/outstanding-achievement-in-dance/

The Award ceremony will be at the Royal Opera House 15th of April 2012 and can be watched on BBC red button, Radio 2 and online.


The Russell Maliphant Company is coming to Huddersfield with The Rodin Project Monday 27th Feb

It’s the only chance to come and watch it up in the north a the moment. Would love to see you there!

Click on the link below to book tickets.

http://www.thelbt.org/Rodin-Project


Sternberg Clarke – Dance Month Q&A: Tommy Franzen from So You Think You Can Dance

Click HERE to get to the Sternberg and Clarke’s blog.


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